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LEARNING BEAUTIFUL JEGOG MUSIC

Is there a better object for teaching a little bit of music to a 2 years old kid, than this impressive Jegog instrument, so typical of West Bali? This is what happened to Anatole in the Dajuma garden where thrones the beautiful instrument. It exists in different sizes, the one shown on the picture being medium. From the bamboo, It generates deep vibrations which are just hypnotic and makes you feel in communion with nature. Undoubtedly, Anatole loved it! Perhaps will he be able in some years to play in the village orchestra! That’s what we wish for him!

ANNUAL JEGOG FESTIVAL AT RAMBUT SIWI

One of the Jembrana’s annual event is the Jegog Festival which was held this year over 3 days, from December 3rd to 5th.
Jegog is a form of gamelan music indigenous to Bali, played on instruments made of bamboo. Born in West Bali in the 1920’s in a small village close to Dajuma, it has started to become popular in other regions of Bali and even abroad in Japan, Germany and the US.
The annual festival aims at preserving, developing and fostering Jegog as a cultural object of prime importance. It is a unique traditional music as a symbol of creativity and the original identity of Jembrana people and culture. This year, the festival agenda was particularly heavy with the participation of 84 Jegog groups from all around Jembrana (including school groups) and 2,520 artists. Hundreds of visitors, including our guests, enjoyed the exhibitions of the forms and types of Jegog and listened their unique sounds. Seminars attended by jegog artists, cultural figures, creators and observers of the Jegog also took place. On the last day, mass Jegog staging (Jegog Mebarung) accompanied by the performance of Joged Dance shown on the picture closed the festival.

KUKUL ANOTHER INTERESTING TRADITION OF BALINESE CULTURE

Kulkul is a traditional communication tool of the Balinese people. It is a big wooden bell installed at the top of decorated towers erected in the middle of each village in Bali. Inherited from the ancestors one can find it in every traditional organization in Bali. It is used like an alarm for Balinese people and, depending on the number of strikes on the bell, has different meanings such as invitations to regular meetings of the villagers, ceremony preparations or natural disasters. Besides having a role in the lives of Balinese people, Kulkul is also used in smaller size, as a musical instrument in several art performances. This is what is shown on the picture this week. Dajuma is used to organise entertainments combining traditional Balinese music (Jegog) and dances. At the end of the show, our guests are invited to come on stage and play the Kukul instrument with our musicians. They love it!

BALI MORE BALINESE

Part of the large Indonesia and its 279 Million inhabitants, welcoming 4 millions foreigners every year, one’s may fear that the small island of Bali could be losing step by step its brilliant culture and traditions.
This was before the new Bali’s Governor, Wayan KOSTER was elected last June, and made it clear that his administration intends to bring Bali back to its cultural roots, which is now effective through several decrees.
Changes are visible from anyone in Bali after applying these two:
N° 79/2018 Decree regarding customary Balinese Dress use stipulates that people working in Bali should don traditional wear every Thursday.
Same requirement during full moon (Purnama Day), new moon (Tilem Day), anniversary of Bali Province, regency anniversary days, and city anniversaries.
The island’s indigenous langage is traditionally written with an elaborate Brahmic-derived script natively known as Aksara Bali and Hanacaraka. Used in ceremonies and religious texts, the traditional script is deeply tied to Balinese Hindu practices.
“I think Balinese letters, Balinese text is in our identity, a symbol of our civilization” he said.
In accordance with Decree n° 80/2018, Balinese script will be written alongside Latin writing in public facilities, including our hotel as shown on the picture with the new signage on the road.
Many opportunities to enjoy the graceful « Udeng » on men head and women « Kebaya », and remember the Balinese long History through its everywhere writing.
On the picture taken in Dajuma garden, besides our colorful Jegog music instrument, some of our staff proud to wear the traditional Balinese dressing every thursday. From left to right, Dina, Alit, Kadek, Gusalit and Erly.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Very festive atmosphere this December 31st in Dajuma to celebrate the new year! Around a delicious “Babi Guling” (grilled pig) more than 70 guests shared the last hours of the year in a varied musical atmosphere, alternating Jegog, modern songs and traditional dances. On the last strokes of midnight, they exchanged their wishes under the stars while a magnificent fireworks was fired from the beach. All Dajuma staff wishes you a very happy 2019!

NEW CYCLING TOUR “TEMBLES”

Is there anything more authentic than discovering a new place by cycling? At Dajuma we encourage as much as possible this way of visiting our area where, behind each curve of the small roads, there is something ubuffanbuffaique to discover. Let’s take an example with our brand new tour called “Tembles Discovery”.  You start from Dajuma around 8 a.m. in our adventure jeep, the bicycles in the back. After 30 mn drive you reach a traditional Balinese village called Tembles which is the starting point of your cycling tour along the rice fields. You will visit the House of Jegog (traditional music from West Bali), the village primary school, the traditional market and the very holy Rambut Siwi Temple at the end. You are back at Dajuma around 12, ready for the lunch.

ORIGINAL DANCES FROM WEST BALI: A MUST!

Jembrana, the West Bali Regency, is now famous with the Jegog music (Bamboo Orchestra) and the Mekepung (Buffalo Races). But it also has some dances that were originally created by local Jembrana’s artists. These original dances are Luihing Paksi Dance, Mekepung Dance and Cempaka Putih Dance.
Luihing Paksi Dance is inspired by the white starling bird (Jalak Bali), that can only be found in West Bali. It stories about the wildlife of starling bird in the jungle, which plays and flies from one tree to another. This dance is accompanied by Jegog and vocal instruments from the musicians.
Jembrana also has Mekepung Dance which is inspired by the Buffalo Race attractions. This is a new dance creation that reflects the process of the buffalo race, from its preparation and race itself. This dance also accompanied by Jegog Instrument.
The icon of Jembrana’s dance is Cempaka Putih Dance, Cempaka (Magnolia) is one of the flower in Bali. This dance depicts the beauty and fragrant of the white cempaka flower which become one of the means of ceremony or worship of Hindu people. Cempaka Putih dance is accompanied by Jegog music, mixed with metal music instrument (gamelan) and vocal instrument as well. Don’t miss to discover these 3 pearls of West Bali culture on the occasion of your next stay with us!

CULTURAL EXPERIENCES AT DAJUMA

Because of its proximity to the cradle of Jegog music, it was natural for Dajuma to invest in one of these beautiful Jegog instruments, made entirely by hand from bamboo and teak wood by skilled craftsmen from the nearby villages. Our guests often ask us to discover the Balinese culture whose music and dance are essential points of reference. Many of our employees know how to play this instrument and are happy to introduce our guests to this special music. Why special? Because it generates sounds and vibrations that touch you deep within yourself.
This new instrument is a useful addition to the Balinese dance classes given every week by the Pekutatan Dance School on the Dajuma stage. We hope you will like it!

JOGED BUMBUNG DANCE AT DAJUMA

Last week in Dajuma took place an evening show featuring the famous traditional Balinese dances accompanied by the Gamelan Jegog orchestra. Born in West Bali a few kilometers from Dajuma, the gamelan jegog is one of the most impressive sounding ensembles in the world. It is an orchestra of bamboo marimbas, with keys (tubes) ranging from small to gigantic. The largest tubes, up to three meters long, are used for the bass jegog, for which the ensemble is named. The vibrations created by the instruments are transmitted through the ground to your own body, creating a unique feeling of wellness. At the end of the show, the guests are invited to dance on the stage the other famous Joged Bumbung dance. A nice moment of sharing!

HAPPY NEW YEAR! SELAMAT TAHUN BARU!

The festivities of this end of the year were particularly warm in Dajuma. Around a delicious buffet with its traditional Baby Guling and Ayam Betutu and 3 orchestras including 2 traditional (Gamelan and Jegog) a young dance troupe (photo), all children of the surrounding villages, have interpreted the beautiful story of Rama and Sinta inspired by Ramayana. On the 12 strokes of midnight, the guests exchanged their vows on the stage while striking the famous kul kul (a piece of bamboo sounding like a bell when hit by a stick) under a magnificent fireworks display. The band Bagus from Negara closed the evening with Linda, a wonderful singer in live. The year 2017 really got off to a good start!