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FOR BALINESE AND FOR BALI LOVERS: KITES, TRADITIONS, ART AND FUN

Playing kites or “Melayangan” is a tradition going through generations that is assiduously practiced by Balinese people. It is originated from the habits of farmer’s children who spend their time playing in the rice fields. To get rid of boredom while guarding the fields and livestock, they have fun playing kites. In Bali, there is a mythological story of “Rare Angon” or the god of kites. “Rare Angon” is believed by Hindus to be the incarnation of Lord Shiva who has the image of a child while herding buffaloes in the fields, so the kites traditions also called as Rare Angon Traditions.

Traditional Balinese kites are known for their three forms. First, the Be-bean kite. This kite is shaped like a fish, the word Be in be-bean means fish in Balinese.

Second, is the Pecuk Kite. The shape of this kite is simple. Has four corners that are bent and look like leaves. It is called “Pecuk” because in Balinese, pecuk means to bend.

The last is the Janggan kite. This kite is a sacred kite. The shape is very unique, like a dragon which is believed by Balinese people to be like a guardian of the balance and stability of the earth.

Between July – September, anywhere you see the Bali’s sky will beautifully decorated and various shapes of kites. In front of Dajuma everyday you will see children playing with their kites.

Will you play with them next time you visit us?

ANNUAL JEGOG FESTIVAL AT RAMBUT SIWI

One of the Jembrana’s annual event is the Jegog Festival which was held this year over 3 days, from December 3rd to 5th.
Jegog is a form of gamelan music indigenous to Bali, played on instruments made of bamboo. Born in West Bali in the 1920’s in a small village close to Dajuma, it has started to become popular in other regions of Bali and even abroad in Japan, Germany and the US.
The annual festival aims at preserving, developing and fostering Jegog as a cultural object of prime importance. It is a unique traditional music as a symbol of creativity and the original identity of Jembrana people and culture. This year, the festival agenda was particularly heavy with the participation of 84 Jegog groups from all around Jembrana (including school groups) and 2,520 artists. Hundreds of visitors, including our guests, enjoyed the exhibitions of the forms and types of Jegog and listened their unique sounds. Seminars attended by jegog artists, cultural figures, creators and observers of the Jegog also took place. On the last day, mass Jegog staging (Jegog Mebarung) accompanied by the performance of Joged Dance shown on the picture closed the festival.

HAPPY EVENT IN DAJUMA

On September 25th, Dajuma was happy to celebrate a special event, the wedding of our front desk officer Astari with Riski, previously cook at Dajuma and now teacher at the Negara Hotel School. One day before the celebration, according to the Balinese custom, the families of the fiances invited their relatives to a joyful party in Astari’s family house, located close to Dajuma. And on September 25th was the wedding ceremony, where some of our guests were invited to join and congratulate the young married. We are used to inform our guests about ceremonies around the hotel and pleased to invite them, if they would like to participate in. A day after the wedding day (September 26th ) was the wedding reception at Riski’s house and all of our staff came to attend it. Congratulations Astari and Risky! Our best wishes of happyness!

KUKUL ANOTHER INTERESTING TRADITION OF BALINESE CULTURE

Kulkul is a traditional communication tool of the Balinese people. It is a big wooden bell installed at the top of decorated towers erected in the middle of each village in Bali. Inherited from the ancestors one can find it in every traditional organization in Bali. It is used like an alarm for Balinese people and, depending on the number of strikes on the bell, has different meanings such as invitations to regular meetings of the villagers, ceremony preparations or natural disasters. Besides having a role in the lives of Balinese people, Kulkul is also used in smaller size, as a musical instrument in several art performances. This is what is shown on the picture this week. Dajuma is used to organise entertainments combining traditional Balinese music (Jegog) and dances. At the end of the show, our guests are invited to come on stage and play the Kukul instrument with our musicians. They love it!

How the villagers of Pekutatan celebrate Independence Day

In August, all Indonesia is keen to comemorate the independence day. Many funny activities were held on this occasion. Having no desire to break with this fine tradition, Pekutatan Village held its own activities, prepared and organised by its villagers. Few days before the independence day, there are some funny games, gate decoration competition using only natural material, Balinese dances performances and many more (see on picture). On August 17th was the formal flag ceremony, with the participation of students from the local schools based in Pekutatan, government officials, police, army and villagers representatives. This year, all the participants of flag ceremony were wearing Balinese traditional dress based on the instruction of the Bali Governor.

BALI MORE BALINESE

Part of the large Indonesia and its 279 Million inhabitants, welcoming 4 millions foreigners every year, one’s may fear that the small island of Bali could be losing step by step its brilliant culture and traditions.
This was before the new Bali’s Governor, Wayan KOSTER was elected last June, and made it clear that his administration intends to bring Bali back to its cultural roots, which is now effective through several decrees.
Changes are visible from anyone in Bali after applying these two:
N° 79/2018 Decree regarding customary Balinese Dress use stipulates that people working in Bali should don traditional wear every Thursday.
Same requirement during full moon (Purnama Day), new moon (Tilem Day), anniversary of Bali Province, regency anniversary days, and city anniversaries.
The island’s indigenous langage is traditionally written with an elaborate Brahmic-derived script natively known as Aksara Bali and Hanacaraka. Used in ceremonies and religious texts, the traditional script is deeply tied to Balinese Hindu practices.
“I think Balinese letters, Balinese text is in our identity, a symbol of our civilization” he said.
In accordance with Decree n° 80/2018, Balinese script will be written alongside Latin writing in public facilities, including our hotel as shown on the picture with the new signage on the road.
Many opportunities to enjoy the graceful « Udeng » on men head and women « Kebaya », and remember the Balinese long History through its everywhere writing.
On the picture taken in Dajuma garden, besides our colorful Jegog music instrument, some of our staff proud to wear the traditional Balinese dressing every thursday. From left to right, Dina, Alit, Kadek, Gusalit and Erly.

“JINENG”: A PEARL OF THE BALINESE HERITAGE

The Traditional Storage Jineng is one of the traditional Balinese buildings which is inherited from the elders. In the past Jineng was built as a rice barn/rice storage and other harvests. The part under the storage is usually used for relaxing or enjoying a coffee/tea with family or guest. For Balinese people, behind the uniqueness of Jineng, there is a philosophy of life which is taught us about how we could being productive, live frugally as a way to sustain prosperous life in a sustainable manner. Because of its uniqueness, Jineng still exists till present, even now people build a Jineng as a bedroom, some hotels in Bali use the concept and the shape of Jineng, like what we have in Dajuma, our two bedroom wooden villa (Pondok Segara Villa) has the Jineng shape. For the people who live in rural areas and have Jineng at home, they use Jineng as a ceremonial stuff storage.
“Let’s keep the tradition and culture for our next generation” is our motto at Dajuma!

Dajuma Cultural Experience: Jagatnatha Temples

In Bali there are three famous public temples called Jagatnatha Temples respectively located in Denpasar, Buleleng and Jembrana regencies.
In Jembrana regency, it is situated in Negara City, 25 km from Dajuma. Its erection started in 1996 and was completed in 2002. This one has several specific features compared with the others: a very beautiful architecture and, above all, a 40 meters high « Padmasana » (looking like a tower), which makes it the highest among the three temples. In this temple the people worships Sang Hyang Jagatnatha as the king and the protector of the Universe. The most important ceremony is held once a year (second full moon of Balinese calendar), the Hindu people prays in this temple not only during the temple ceremony but also in other holy days. In the Nista Mandala (outside area) of the temple there is an open stage that is usually used for performing Balinese dances, traditional music and other arts. It also has a beautiful garden. Jembrana government is currently developing a 5.4 hectares piece of land, behind the JagatnathaTemple, as a botanical garden which is still under construction and is targeted to be completed by the end of this year. A holy place which definitively deserves to be visited next time you decide to come over!

Dajuma Experience: Genuine Balinese Food

One of our “Dajuma Experiences” particularly appreciated by our guests is a lunch in the pure Balinese tradition. We prepare this unique experience on the occasion of our farming and plantation tours. For the farming tour, the lunch takes place in the middle of the rice fields as shown on the picture, whereas, for the plantation one, the pique-nique is held in the mountain with a breathtaking view of the ocean. In both cases, the food is prepared and cooked by our local friends from the nearby villages. The various foods that are served are really like what the local people are serving at home for their family. In the rice farming tour the dishes are presented in the “Kubu” (small gazebo) and guest really enjoy a delicious lunch with beautiful scenery and fresh air of the rice terraces. When do you plan to come over?

BALINESE WEDDING: A UNIQUE CULTURAL EXPERIENCE

Among cultural experiences offered to our guests there is one which is particularly appreciated: the participation to a local wedding. This is what happened last week to Robert and Janett from Germany who were invited to the wedding ceremony of Agus and Tina, a few kilometers from Dajuma. Agus completed his training as waiter at Dajuma last year. Our front desk staff helped Robert and Janett wear the traditional dressing. They enjoyed a lot this important moment of sharing. Congratulations to the newlyweds !